Download C++ Primer by Stanley B. Lippman PDF

By Stanley B. Lippman

This seems to be good written, yet didn't swimsuit my needs---too complex for my wishes.

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5. The ability to specify a size with which to create the array. ) 6. The ability to initialize the array to a set of values. 7. The ability to provide access via an index to the individual elements of the array. For argument's sake, let's assert that our users expressed a strong desire to use the subscript operator to accomplish this. 8. The ability to intercept and flag bad index values. For argument's sake, let's presume that we feel very strongly about this ability and have not asked our users how they feel about it.

The allocation and deallocation of dynamic objects, in contrast, must be managed explicitly by the programmer and, in practice, is considerably more error-prone. It is accomplished through the use of the new and delete expressions. Objects are allocated dynamically through one of two versions of the new expression. The first instance allocates a single object of a specific type. For example, int *pint = new int( 1024 ); allocates an unnamed object of type int, initializes that object to a first value of 1024, and then returns the address of the object in memory.

1. Static objects are named variables that we manipulate directly, whereas dynamic objects are unnamed variables we manipulate indirectly through pointers. We'll see an example of this in a moment. 2. The allocation and deallocation of static objects is handled automatically by the compiler; the programmer needs to understand it but need not do anything about it. The allocation and deallocation of dynamic objects, in contrast, must be managed explicitly by the programmer and, in practice, is considerably more error-prone.

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